Photos from Tibet

Posted by on Nov 10, 2006 in Tibet | 10 Comments

All of my photos from Tibet are up in the gallery. Tajikistan is up there as well and I think they’re pretty interesting—maybe because you don’t see pictures of Tajikistan every day. My only regret is the Alichur gallery. You see, somehow I deleted an entire 512mb memory card full of images. Some of them I could have parted with, but I had photos of the local kids that were fun and a wonderful portrait of a farmer who invited me into his home for tea. Losing that one hurts.

10 Comments

  1. Lisa
    November 10, 2006

    So sorry to hear about your pictures! I think you can lock individual “keeper” ones inside the camera… Stay warm!

  2. Sonia
    November 10, 2006

    Hope this doesn’t come off sounding like a dumb Amerrrrcan (said in my best Dubya accent) question… But I noticed that a lot of the people in your Tibet pics have *really* ruddy cheeks. Almost as if someone had just given ’em a big ol’ smack across the face. Is it because of the cold? The elevation? Something in their genetic makeup? Inquiring minds want to know. 😉

    I’m having a moment of silence now for your lost pics. I know how much that sucks!

  3. Claudia
    November 10, 2006

    Your picture are just amazing! Thanks for sharing!
    Pura Vida,
    Claudia

  4. Mr. Peepers
    November 10, 2006

    I really liked your pictures. Maybe I can travel with you next time.

    Love,

    Mr. Peepers

  5. lucas
    November 10, 2006

    Cool pics. I know this was mentioned somewhere else already.. but what camera are you hauling around again? Nikon something something

  6. Megan
    November 12, 2006

    I should use that ‘lock’ feature, Lisa. I wonder, does it prevent them form being erased even if you format the card? I was aldready pushing things downloading to a hard drive at 4,000 meters.

    Sonia,
    Rosy cheeks are a trademark of Tibetans. I’m not exactly sure why they look that way but I can speculate that it’s in part genetics, a lot of wind, harsh conidtions, dry skin and altitude. Some children seem to have almost a scaly skin problem too… everyone’s skin is really dry. I noticed the same thing about ethnic Tibetans that I met in Xiahe during Phase 1. Xiahe is on a plateau but it’s not anywhere as high as Lhasa.

    Thanks, C!

    Mr. Peepers,
    I think that taking a dog traveling with me might be difficult. Plus, I’ve heard how antagonizing you can be to my niece-dog, Lily and am not sure you’d be the best company. Besides, dogs in herding areas are really mean! I know you’re tough, but you could get hurt.

    Lucas,
    My main camera is a Nikon D70s. Now there’s a new model D80 out but most people will be okay with a lot less camera. In fact, if you’re a newbie but still want to lug a DSLR you might want to look at the D50… and Canon makes some smaller SLRs too. I’ll post a pic of my camera equipment soon.

  7. lucas
    November 12, 2006

    I actually was very close to buying a D80 but I wussed out. It’s not so much the money but just that I’m not sure I want to haul that mofo around.

  8. David R
    November 13, 2006

    The pics are beautiful. Thank you.

  9. Megan
    November 15, 2006

    Yeah, Lucas, the mofo is a pain in the back! Really, it mostly comes down to the lens. My 20mm fixed lens is light but the 18-200 really adds the pounds. Plus it’s kinda awkward to fit into my bag. It’s not so bad when I have it in it’s own case around my body but when I am also carrying a bag for my books or whatever it gets super heavy.

  10. Lisa
    November 16, 2006

    I checked the manual and protecting files does not protect them from deletion when formatting the memory card. But you could use it when you know you have a great picture to avoid other accidents. I’m not sure if lithium ion batteries are affected by the cold but you may want to keep one in an inside shirt pocket if you go hiking at that altitude.